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Aranya Agricultural Alternatives’ Permaculture Design Internships

We bring our project to India for training and implementation of permaculture design internships. Interns learn practical and effective skills for working on poor rural farms in foreign environments. The interns become proficient in Permaculture International Aid while poor rural farmers benefit from life changing permaculture improvements to their farms and villages.

Overview of Internship:

The beginning weeks of the internship start at the Aranya Agricultural Alternatives farm and orient the intern to Indian culture, agriculture and permaculture practices.  Aranya’s specialty is water harvesting for watershed restoration and farm use. The Aranya farm is an excellent location to learn Indian permaculture, plant identification and uses.  Through the practicum, interns will help further permaculture practices on the farm.  The Aranya farm is an oasis and excellent example of rainfed agriculture in the drylands.

The second phase is the social and environmental study.  Interns learn, listen and get to know villagers they will be working with.  Trust, respect and friendships are mutually built  during this time.  This is a very important part of engaging in a beneficial aid project.  During this section, interns will make an evaluation of what is needed and decide what approach to take in their design project.

The third phase is the design and implementation of a project in the village or on a villager’s farm land.  These projects are functional permaculture model farms that inspire other villagers about what possibilities are available to them.  In this section, interns will learn mapping and project skills to be a permaculture consultant in their home country or in other places of the world.

After this phase, there is a 2 month break due to extremely hot weather.  Some members of the permaculture design internships choose to explore India, others return home to work.   This is a good time to exit the country and renew your visa.

The fourth phase begins in the middle of June, when the rainy season starts.  This is the implementation time for the planting part of the project.  Food forests, annual food crops and live fences will be planted.

The following year, a follow up report is required for certification.  This is because permaculture design internships and aid projects are often implemented without evaluation of how they actually benefited the target community.  In this phase, interns will be able to learn from the successes and problems of their project, and follow-up with their farmer client.

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Welcome to Permaculture Patashala – Permaculture Design Internships

Aranya Agricultural Alternatives’ Permaculture Design Internships

We bring our project to India for training and implementation of permaculture design internships. Interns learn practical and effective skills for working on poor rural farms in foreign environments. The interns become proficient in Permaculture International Aid while poor rural farmers benefit from life changing permaculture improvements to their farms and villages.

Overview of Internship:

The beginning weeks of the internship start at the Aranya Agricultural Alternatives farm and orient the intern to Indian culture, agriculture and permaculture practices.  Aranya’s specialty is water harvesting for watershed restoration and farm use. The Aranya farm is an excellent location to learn Indian permaculture, plant identification and uses.  Through the practicum, interns will help further permaculture practices on the farm.  The Aranya farm is an oasis and excellent example of rainfed agriculture in the drylands.

The second phase is the social and environmental study.  Interns learn, listen and get to know villagers they will be working with.  Trust, respect and friendships are mutually built  during this time.  This is a very important part of engaging in a beneficial aid project.  During this section, interns will make an evaluation of what is needed and decide what approach to take in their design project.

The third phase is the design and implementation of a project in the village or on a villager’s farm land.  These projects are functional permaculture model farms that inspire other villagers about what possibilities are available to them.  In this section, interns will learn mapping and project skills to be a permaculture consultant in their home country or in other places of the world.

After this phase, there is a 2 month break due to extremely hot weather.  Some members of the permaculture design internships choose to explore India, others return home to work.   This is a good time to exit the country and renew your visa.

The fourth phase begins in the middle of June, when the rainy season starts.  This is the implementation time for the planting part of the project.  Food forests, annual food crops and live fences will be planted.

The following year, a follow up report is required for certification.  This is because permaculture design internships and aid projects are often implemented without evaluation of how they actually benefited the target community.  In this phase, interns will be able to learn from the successes and problems of their project, and follow-up with their farmer client.

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  • 2017 IPC India

    The 13th International Permaculture Convergence will be held in Hydrabad, India. ad
  • 2016 NPC

    2016 National Permaculture Convergence in Hydrabad, by Aranya Agricultural Alternatives ad
  • Responsibility

    Agriculture is a way of life, for as long as there are human beings, we will be growing food. ad
  • Get Funded

    Fund Your Permaculture Design Course
    Let our partner, We the Trees, help find funding for your Permaculture Design Course Certification through Permaculture Patashala. PDC-specific crowd funding opportunity.

  • Swaraj- Self-sufficiency

    Our mentor, Narsanna Koppula, reverses an Indian proverb that says, “Don’t treat your money like water” and he says, “Don’t treat your water like money”.

    His permaculture begins with helping farmers develop water catchment systems that allow them to be self-sufficient with their water (jala swaraj). He teaches them to diversify their crops and leave no ground left fallow to develop a self-sufficient (swaraj) farm. This allows for the formation of Mahatma Gandhi’s final goal of a self-sustainable community (gram swaraj).

  • Meet the People where they are

    Narsanna says, "Previously, cover crop seed was put down on the ground before harvest and human harvesters pushed it into the ground while they harvested. Modern heavy machinery instead is too heavy and compacts the soil during harvesting.

    You can’t take away the mechanized harvesters, as it is now part of modern farming, but you have to integrate something to aerate the soil to compensate for this."

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